ASSEMBLYMEMBER CHAU ANNOUNCES NEW LAWS THAT TAKE EFFECT IN 2019

Friday, October 5, 2018

Press Conference with Guest Speakers

MONTEREY PARK – Today, Assemblymember Ed Chau (D–Monterey Park) held a press conference in Monterey Park to discuss bills from his legislative bill package that will become new laws on January 1, 2019.  

“California residents across the state expect us, as Legislators, to act on issues affecting their everyday lives,” said Assemblymember Chau.  “Some of the legislation I authored this year will help to protect consumers from data breaches, provide consumers with greater notice when their life insurance policies are going to increase, require that retailers carry out age verification checks, prohibit online marketing of cannabis products to minors, and accurately calculate greenhouse gas emissions from natural gas imported into the state.”

Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. signed a total of 11 bills authored by Assemblymember Chau.  Some of the bills highlighted in today’s press conference included:

Consumer Protection

AB 1859 – Consumer Credit Reporting Agencies: Customer Records – Requires Consumer Credit Reporting Agencies to protect consumer information by patching vulnerable computer systems expeditiously or be subject to enforcement actions by the Attorney General if a breach occurs and the personal information of California residents is compromised because of a failure to patch the systems. Sponsor: Author. (Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 532, Statutes of 2018)

AB 2634 – Life Insurance – Requires an insurer to provide notice to a policyholder of a flexible premium life insurance policy whenever the policy is subject to an increase in the cost of insurance charge or administrative expense charge, no later than 90 days before the effective date of the increase so that the policyholder can make informed decisions and plan accordingly to avoid a possible cancellation of coverage. Sponsor: California Department of Insurance. (Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 545, Statutes of 2018)

Protecting Minors

AB 2511 – The Parent’s Accountability and Child Protection Act Requires retailers, when selling products illegal to sell to minors, to take reasonable steps to ensure the purchasers of those products are of legal age. Sponsor: Children’s Advocacy Institute. (Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 872, Statutes of 2018)

AB 3067 – Internet Cannabis Marketing: Minors – Prohibits the operator of an Internet Web site or online service, online application, or mobile application from marketing cannabis products or services to a minor.  Sponsor: Author. (Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 347, Statutes of 2018)

Environment

AB 2195 – Natural Gas Emissions – Requires the California Air Resources Board to quantify the amount of greenhouse gas emissions associated with the leakage of gas to the atmosphere during the production, processing, and transport of natural gas that is imported into the state from out-of-state sources. Sponsor: Environmental Defense Fund. (Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 371, Statutes of 2018)

Other bills signed into law include the following:

Assembly Bill (AB) 347 - Weights and Measures Inspection Fees – Extends the sunset date for the Commercial Weighing and Measuring Device Registration Program from January 1, 2019 to January 1, 2022; establishes a phased in device fee for liquefied natural gas and compressed natural gas dispensers; clarifies that the device fee limitation for jewelry and prescription scales also applies to Class II scales; and increases the device registration fee limitations for computing scales from $20 to $23 to offset increased testing costs. Sponsor: California Agricultural Commissioners and Sealers Association. (Chaptered by Secretary of State – Chapter 521, Statutes of 2018)

AB 375 – California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018– Gives California consumers greater rights to exercise control over their personal information, and provides reasonable certainty that there are safeguards in place to protect against data misuse. Specifically, it gives consumers the right to request that a business disclose the type and specific pieces of personal information that it collects or sells about the consumer; the business purposes for collecting or selling the information; and the categories of third parties with whom the information is shared, sold, or disclosed. It also generally gives consumers the right to request that a business delete any personal information collected from them and requires businesses to direct service providers to do the same. It also gives consumers the right to opt-out of the sale of their personal information, while requiring affirmative consent to sell the personal information of kids up to age 16 (also known as the right to “opt in”), and ensures the right to equal service and price, meaning companies cannot discriminate against providing services to people if they do not want their data sold. Sponsor: Author. (Chaptered by Secretary of State – Chapter 55, Statutes of 2018)

AB 1739 – Revocable Transfer on Death Deeds – Provides that the Frequently Asked Questions page that accompanies a revocable transfer on death deed is not required to be recorded in order for the deed to be legally effective. Sponsor: Author. (Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 65, Statutes of 2018)

AB 1999 – Local Government: Public Broadband Services – Expands existing authority for municipal and public utility districts to develop public broadband services to other types of local government, and require those entities to adhere to “net neutrality rules” when providing such services. Sponsor: Author.  (Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 963, Statutes of 2018)

AB 2485 – Code Enforcement: Financially Interested Parties – Prohibits a local government code enforcement officer or health officer from being accompanied by a person with a potential financial interest in the outcome of the inspection, when inspecting a commercial property or business for compliance with a state statute or regulation, or local ordinance. Sponsor: Author. (Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 263, Statutes of 2018)

AB 2764 – Information Technology (IT) Contracting – Ensures that the State will not enter into large scale contracts for IT goods and services with vendors who discriminate against their employees, or contract with vendors who have large tax delinquencies, and otherwise ensures that vendors doing business with the State adhere to National Labor Relations Board orders and the Darfur Contracting Act of 2008. Sponsor: Author. (Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 220, Statutes of 2018)

 

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